The Week in Numbers

Sales, Stars & Stripes and Santiago celebrations

(FIFA.com)
Chile's midfielder Arturo Vidal, Chile's midfielder Charles Aranguiz and Chile's defender Gary Medel celebrate
© AFP

In FIFA.com's latest stats review, international successes for USA, England, Chile and Sweden feature alongside the latest in a long line of big-money departures from Porto.

105

years of waiting ended for Chile on Saturday when they won their first major trophy: the Copa America. Perhaps fittingly, La Roja's opponents were Argentina, the same team they had faced in their first-ever match in May 1910. This long-awaited success came after 173 matches in this tournament for the Chileans, dating back to the Copa America's first edition in 1916. But while one drought ended, another continued, with Argentina extending past 22 years their wait for a major trophy. Of former FIFA World Cup™ winners, only England - at 49 years - have waited longer, with *La Albiceleste *having now lost each of their last seven finals in senior competitions. Three of those losses have come in the Copa America (2004, 2007 and 2015) and Javier Mascherano has been in the team for all of them, leaving him with more runners-up medals than any other player in the tournament's history.

61

years after affiliating to UEFA and 111 years after their association's formation, Sweden finally laid their hands on a European title last week. The victory in the UEFA U-21 European Championship final was the Scandinavians' first in any UEFA men's competition and came after an impressive campaign which culminated in a dramatic penalty shootout win over Portugal. The Iberians had also been chasing their first U-21 crown but, unlike their fellow finalists, had seven previous continental triumphs behind them at different youth levels - not to mention a couple of FIFA U-20 world crowns. It was the Swedes, though, who became the tenth different winners in just 20 editions of the U-21 event, with Italy - eliminated alongside England by the eventual winners during the group phase - its record champions with five titles. Hakan Ericon's side will now lead the European contingent at the Men's Olympic Football Tournament, the competition in which Sweden enjoyed their greatest triumph to date by taking gold in 1948.

35

million euros was the hefty fee that last week took Colombian striker Jackson Martinez to Atletico Madrid. The size of the outlay was ultimately no great surprise, primarily because of the player's talent but also due to the club doing the selling. No-one, after all, has proved better at making such deals than Porto, with Martinez the ninth player the Portuguese outfit have sold for a fee in excess of €30m. No other club has managed to sell more than five players in this same price bracket. Since winning the UEFA Champions League in 2004, Porto have raked in well over €500 million in transfer fees, with Deco, Pepe, Hulk, James Rodriguez and Danilo just a few of the players to have been moved on. Indeed, the signing of Martinez didn't even serve to break Atletico's transfer record, which remains the €40m they paid out - to Porto, of course - for Radamel Falcao in 2011.

3

FIFA Women's World Cups™ is the new record haul that belongs to USA after their spectacular win in Sunday's Canada 2015 Final. The Stars & Stripes' Carli Lloyd-inspired 5-2 victory over Japan took them past Germany into outright first place in the all-time standings, with all manner of records rewritten in the process. The match itself was comfortably the highest-scoring Women's World Cup final of all time, eclipsing inside 27 minutes the previous benchmark of four - set by the same teams four years earlier. And in a fixture in which no-one had previously scored before the 20-minute mark, USA established a 4-0 lead inside an incredible opening 16. It was during that period that Lloyd, the tournament's outstanding player, became the first women to net a hat-trick in a World Cup Final. The result ended Japan's nine-game unbeaten run at the women's showpiece and re-established USA's traditional dominance of this fixture, with their win-loss ratio against the Asians now standing at a lopsided 25-1. One of the few records to elude Jill Ellis and her players was the tournament's clean sheet benchmark, which remains with Germany (six games and 679 minutes) after Hope Solo's five-match run without conceding ended at 539 minutes.

0

wins in 20 meetings with Germany was the statistic that England's women ripped up on Saturday. Having suffered 18 defeats and just two draws in their previous encounters, the Lionesses finally got the better of their fellow Europeans and, in the process, claimed third place at the Women's World Cup. This represented the best-ever finish by an English team at the tournament, and the best at any senior World Cup since the men's fabled triumph in 1966. Fara Williams claimed the solitary and all-important goal and, in doing so, became her country's all-time leading scorer at the competition, surpassing former team-mate Kelly Smith. It was the first third-place play-off at a Women's World Cup to be decided in extra time and, for Germany, it made history for all the wrong reasons. Their only first, after all, was in failing to score in a second successive match - a fate that had never previously befallen them.

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